You’re better off using Exceptions

Worth reading, for sure.

Eirik Tsarpalis' blog

Exception handling is an error management paradigm that has often been met with criticism. Such criticisms typically revolve around scoping considerations, exceptions-as-control-flow abuse or even the assertion that exceptions are really just a type safe version of goto. To an extent, these seem like valid concerns but it is not within the scope of this article to address those per se.

Such concerns resonate particularly well within FP communities, often taken to the extreme: we should reject exceptions altogether, since code that throws is necessarily impure. In the F# community, this opinion is in part realized by advocating alternatives like result types and railway-oriented programming. In essence, these approaches follow the Either monad found in Haskell, but often intentionally avoiding the use of do notation/computation expressions (since that’s just interpreted exception semantics).

The TL;DR version of the approach is that we define a union type for results that looks…

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TypeShape: Practical Generic Programming in F#

Hmmm…

Eirik Tsarpalis' blog

Last week I announced a new library, TypeShape, with claims that it provides a practical way of doing generic programming in F#. I’m following up with this blog post to elaborate why I believe this to be genuinely useful, and how it could benefit the day-to-day life of the working .NET developer.

The pain of Reflection

Almost everybody who has worked with .NET will at some point need to dabble in the murky ways of reflection. Reflection is needed in scenaria where we need to access data in an indirect fashion, or where circumvention of the type system is necessary.

For example, assume that we have defined the following static method

Assume now that we would like invoke that method, with a value whose type cannot be known at compile time. In other words, we want to define a function

which takes an input of type obj and invokes the generic method…

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Wire – Writing one of the fastest .NET serializers

Worth to try

Roger Johansson Blog

First of all, there is no such thing as “the fastest” serializer, it is all contextual.
But under some conditions, I would however argue that Wire is, by far, the fastest of all the .NET serializers out there.

Given the following POCO type.

Round tripping one million objects of this type, that is, serializing and then deserializing a million objects using Wire with all optimizations on, completes in about 550 milliseconds on my personal laptop.

Doing the same using MS Bond, which is the second fastest serializer in the benchmark, takes about 830 milliseconds, and this is while being very generous to Bond as it has some very specific prerequisites.
Protobuf.NET which is the third serializer on this benchmark completes in about 1360 milliseconds.

Other serializers that was included in the same benchmark was Jil, NetSerializer, FS Pickler, Json.NET and .NET BinaryFormatter.

Just…

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Hottest talks from BUILD 2013

build2013

Last week held a conference BUILD 2013. Lots of great talks sounded there. There is a short list of most interesting in my opinion:

15 Principles for Data Scientists

Open Source Research

I have developed 15 principles for my daily work as a data scientist. These are the principles  that I personally follow :

1- Do not lie with data and do not bullshit: Be honest and frank about empirical evidences. And most importantly do not lie to yourself with data

2- Build everlasting tools and share them with others: Spend a portion of your daily work building tools that makes someone’s life easier. We are freaking humans, we are supposed to be tool builders!

3- Educate yourself continuously: you are a scientist for Bhudda’s sake. Read hardcore math and stats from graduate level textbooks. Never settle down for shitty explanations of a method that you receive from a coworker in the hallway. Learn fundamentals and you can do magic. Read recent papers, go to conferences, publish, and review papers. There is no shortcut for this.

4- Sharpen your skills: learn one language well…

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