F# Weekly #51, 2014

Welcome to F# Weekly,

A roundup of F# content from this past week:

News

Videos/Presentations/Courses

This week from F# Advent Calendar in English

This week from F# Advent Calendar in Japanese

Blogs

F# vNext News

New releases

That’s all for now. Have a great week.

Previous F# Weekly edition – #50Subscribe

Review: F# Deep Dives

F# Deep Dive

Discount code: fshserb (39% off the eBook)

Some days ago, Manning published the final version of a new F# book: “F# Deep Dive“.  I have read MEAP version of the book, and even had a chance to review the final one.

Book is written by the team of famous F# experts such as: Chris Ballard, Keith Battocchi, Colin Bull, Chao-Jen Chen, Yan Cui, Johann Deneux, Kit Eason, Evelina Gabasova, Dmitry Morozov, Don Syme and composed by Tomas Petricek and Phillip Trelford.

First of all, I want to mention that it is not a usual book about F# or another programming language. If you are novice to F# and looking for a guide of language constructs – this book is not the best choice for you. BUT,  if you are already familiar with F# basic syntax constructs, can read simple F# code samples and want to see the language in action – this book is for you.

Book is organized as a collection of independent packages written by different authors. Each author tells his own story about F# application to a practical domain, shows how it was used, how it affected an application design and describes why it was done in such a way. Experts show an application of F# to financial and statistical models, internals of Fsharp.Formatting, numerical computing, social networks analysis, real-world usage of type providers, developing MVC application in idiomatic F#, power of F# Async in action, game development, social web apps in F# and many other interesting topics.

One problem with this book, at least for me, that it is difficult to read it cover to cover. Chapters are written by different authors in a different language, sometimes it was hard for me to catch a sense of computation in a completely new domain. So, for all future readers, I recommend to reorganize chapters according to interests and read parts that most valuable for you first.

Finally, I want to say that the book is really good. Everyone will find interesting topics and a new experience. You will get a broader vision of F# application in a real life. You will see how a functional approach can change and simplify the architecture of real life apps. If you are looking for what to read next – take a look at “F# Deep Dives“, this book is really deserves it.

If you want more F# books – visit fsharp.org.

F# Weekly #50, 2014

Welcome to F# Weekly,

A roundup of F# content from this past week:

News

Videos/Presentations/Courses

This week from F# Advent Calendar in English

This week from F# Advent Calendar in Japanese

Blogs

F# vNext News

New releases

That’s all for now. Have a great week.

Previous F# Weekly edition – #49Subscribe

Becoming an F# contributor

Sergey Tihon:

Awesome!

Originally posted on Mårten Rånge - Meta Programmer:

(This blog post is for December 11 in the F# Advent Calendar 2014)

I enjoy F# and call myself a meta programmer. What can be more meta than programming the programming language? I want to show step-by-step how to become an F# contributor. Basic knowledge of F# is assumed.

The plan is this:

  1. Cloning the F# code repository and building the compiler and core libraries
  2. Adding a new function to FSharp.Core
  3. Adding and running tests

But first the boring stuff…

You can clone F#, learn from the code and build features locally but if you want to contribute to F# ie create a pull request that is merged into the central repository then you need to sign the Contributor License Agreement (CLA). The catch is that if you are employed you probably need your employer’s signature as well. Depending on your employer this can be everything from “No problem”…

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F# Weekly #49, 2014

Welcome to F# Weekly,

A roundup of F# content from this past week:

News

Videos/Presentations/Courses

This week from F# Advent Calendar in English

This week from F# Advent Calendar in Japanese

Blogs

F# vNext News

New releases

That’s all for now. Have a great week.

Previous F# Weekly edition – #48Subscribe

Distributing the F# Mailbox Processor

Sergey Tihon:

Everyone should read it

Originally posted on The Cockney Coder:

Note: This blog post is part of the 2014 F# Advent Calendar. Be sure to check out yesterday’s Intro to Data Science post by Jon Wood!

Mailbox Processors 101

If you’ve been using F# for any reasonable length of time, you’ll have come across the MailboxProcessor, AKA the F# Agent (or Actor). Mailbox Processors are cool. They give us the ability to offload load to background processors without worrying about managing the thread that they live on (as agents silently “go to sleep” when they aren’t processing anything), and they take away the pain of locking as they ensure that only one message will be processed at a time whilst automatically queuing up backed up messages. They also allow us to visualise problems differently to how we might do so when just using a raw Task, in terms of message passing. We can partition data based by pushing them…

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F# Weekly #48, 2014

Welcome to F# Weekly,

A roundup of F# content from this past week:

News

Videos/Presentations/Courses

Blogs

F# vNext News

The F# Open Projects Group is looking for a primary active maintainer for the following repositories:

New releases

That’s all for now. Have a great week.

Previous F# Weekly edition – #47Subscribe

F# Weekly #47, 2014

FsAdvent

Welcome to F# Weekly,

A roundup of F# content from this past week:

News

Videos/Presentations/Courses

Blogs

F# vNext News

New releases

That’s all for now. Have a great week.

Previous F# Weekly edition – #46Subscribe

F# Advent Calendar in English 2014

Update: Event extended until December 31.

Our friends from Japan have a beautiful event called “F# Advent Calendar“. Every day from December 1 to December 31, one awesome volunteer publish a new post about F#. What an amazing way to celebrate Christmas, isn’t it?

Lets support this initiative and do an English version of the calendar. Two blog posts per day is better than one, isn’t it? We need 31 volunteers, who are ready to prepare a post about F# and publish it on specified date.

Rules

Rules are very simple:

  1. Choose F# related topic for your blog post and send it to me on Twitter or leave a comment to this post.
  2. Prepare a blog post in English (about F# or using F#)
  3. Publish your post on specified date (according to the calendar)
  4. Post link to your post on Twitter with hashtags #fsharp and #FsAdvent.

Calendar

Date (December) Author Post Title
01 (Monday)  Scott Wlaschin  FsCheck and property-based testing
02 (Tuesday)  Philae Trelford  Snowflakes
03 (Wednesday)  Jon Wood  My Introduction to Data Science with F#
04 (Thursday)  Isaac Abraham  Distributing the F# Mailbox Processor
05 (Friday)  Richard Dalton  Decorating Immutable Christmas Trees
06 (Saturday)  Steve Shogren  Christmas F# Polymorphism
07 (Sunday)  Richard Minerich  Developing an Algorithm in F#: Fast Rotational Alignments with Gosper’s Hack
08 (Monday)  Tomas Petricek  Composing Christmas with F#
09 (Tuesday)  Jamie Dixon  Using IBM’s Watson With F#
10 (Wednesday)  Dave Thomas  Terror from the Deep
11 (Thursday)  Mårten Rånge  Becoming an F# contributor
12 (Friday)  Andrea Magnorsky  FSharp and games in celebration times
13 (Saturday)  John Tarbox  F# for social media analytics
14 (Sunday)  Bartosz Sypytkowski  Akka.NETremote deployment with F#
15 (Monday)  Evelina Gabasova  Christmas Carol and other eigenvectors
16 (Tuesday)  Tomas Jansson  Pure functional applications (in F#)
17 (Wednesday)  Mark Seemann  Good times with F#
18 (Thursday)  Michael Newton  Modelling Inheritance With Inheritance
19 (Friday)  Carsten König  Having fun with type-level numbers using a type-provider
20 (Saturday)  Mathias Brandewinder  Textogramme
21 (Sunday)  Anthony Brown  The Internet of Things at Scale with F# and Actors
22 (Monday)  Pete Smith  Functional web synergy with F# and OWIN
23 (Tuesday)  Yan Cui  Seven ineffective coding habits many F# programmers don’t have
24 (Wednesday)  Jérémie Chassaing  Fun with talking computer
25 (Thursday)  Ross McKinlay  The North Pole Type Provider
26 (Friday)  Lincoln Atkinson  Nested looping to any depth with break, continue, and return
27 (Saturday)  Stachu Korick  Solving a Rubik’s Cube with F#
28 (Sunday)  Tim Jones  Make Santa Jump
29 (Monday)  Andrew Cherry
30 (Tuesday)  Reed Copsey, Jr.  Gjallarhorn
31 (Wednesday)  Don Syme  XXX
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